CutList Bridge
CutList Bridge
NESAW
New England School of Architectural Woodworking
CutList Plus fx
CutList Plus fx
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Lie-Nielsen Toolworks

Berkshire Woodworkers

Wood Use Site

CabWriter Home Page


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Greg, on left, and students on installation day.Each year the New England School of Architectural Woodworking (NESAW at www.nesaw.com) runs a five month cabinetmaking course. The purpose of the course is to prepare students for a rewarding career in the field of cabinetmaking. Over 90% of NESAW’s job-seeking graduates find employment at architectural woodworking shops across the United States.

The industry is in dire need of skilled craftspeople, due to the record number of retiring workers and the declining number of vocational programs aimed at cabinetmakers.

NESAW LogoSign up now. Classes begin January 5th and enrollment ends on January 10th. Visit the New England School of Architectural Woodworking for details.

 

NESAW’s program teaches the fundamentals of architectural woodworking and offers students the opportunity to work directly with members of the community to design, build, and install projects. This combination of skills-building and real-world experience makes NESAW’s graduates particularly attractive to employers, since it means a safer employee, less on-the-job training and a better understanding of the entire project lifecycle.

Greg installing a sink.Students who enter the program to improve their woodworking skills or start their own businesses also gain from this approach, as they better understand how to more efficiently design and build a quality product.

The New England School of Architectural Woodworking is owned and operated by Greg and Margaret Larson. I first met Greg in the fall of 2011 through introductions made by a former student of Greg’s and mine. I wrote about NESAW in my December 21st 2011, March 29th and June 11th 2012 Chiefwoodworker’s Newsletters.

Margaret serving cake at graduation celebration.That year I taught a SketchUp class for NESAW students. During this period Greg and I spoke at length about what students were learning and the time consuming aspects of custom cabinetmaking. Out of those discussions came CutList Bridge and later CabWriter. Greg and I have worked closely together ever since our first meeting and I have spent numerous hours at the NESAW shop with his students. Each year I teach a live SketchUp course to the students. I t is with this intimate knowledge that I highly recommend visiting the NESAW website if you are interested in a career in cabinetmaking. You will find no better program or more caring people than NESAW, Greg and Margaret.


SketchUp is woodworker’s chosen tool for creating shop drawings; CutList Plus fx by Bridgewood Design is the leading tool for generating optimized sheet layouts and materials lists. These two industry leading tools don’t natively communicate. That became history with the introduction of CutList Bridge. Now CutList Bridge 4 is even more powerful and rich with new features and is ready for even better things to come.

What is CutList Bridge?

Attributes TabCutList Bridge is a SketchUp Ruby extension. It extends the attributes of components to include such things as the material type used in its milling, the species or material name, re-sized dimensions, shop method tags, the sub-assembly to which it belongs and much more. These attributes are attached to the component and stored in the model file. The user can export these attribute to either: a .cwx file, which can be opened in CutList Plus fx version 12.3 or higher; or to a comma separated value file (.csv aka CSV) and subsequently imported to Microsoft Excel, Open/Office Calc or any spread sheet application that supports CSV importing. Either of these methods will produce a cut list but CutList Plus fx will also produce a materials list, optimized cutting diagrams and project costing.

Setup TabA very important feature of CutList Bridge is that it stores all components’ material and milling attributes in the SketchUp model file. The user need keep only one file of a design and doesn’t have to worry about synchronizing other files when design changes are made. The CWX, CSV, CutList Plus fx, Excel or OpenOffice Calc files can all be reproduced in about four mouse clicks.

What’s New in CutList Bridge 4?

CutList Bridge 3 added four new fields to the cut list .csv file: Tags, Fin T, Fin W and Fin L. However, they were only available for import to Excel and OpenOffice Calc; they could not be imported to CutList Plus fx. This limitation is eliminated in version 4.0, a major release with new functionality. Some of the new functionality was added to support CabWriter, a future new extension that will add to the SketchUp/CutList Bridge/CutList Plus design process. Other functionality was added to generally improve the extension for all woodworking projects. Here is a list of the new functionality and fixes:

CutList Bridge to CutList Plus fx

1. A Legacy Mode checkbox has been added to the Extended Entity Info dialog box Setup tab. If you do not have either a Gold or Platinum CutList Plus fx license of revision 12.3 or higher you should check Legacy Mode. In Legacy Mode you will not be able to export the Tags, Fin T, Fin W and Fin L columns. Legacy Mode is unchecked when CutList Bridge 4.0 is installed.

2. When using the File/Export to CutList Plus fx command a file is saved in the same folder (place) as the SketchUp model file (.skp), with the same name as the model. The file extension will be .cwx if Legacy Mode in not checked. If Legacy Mode is checked the file extension will be .csv.

3. The Tags, Fin T, Fin W and Fin L columns are now included in a File/Export to CutList Plus fx operation. In CutList Bridge 4 the command File/Export to CutList Plus fx now produces a file with the same name as the SketchUp model file but with the extension .cwx (a.k.a CWX) . Users of CutList Plus fx version 12.3 or higher can now open this file with the command File/Open. The fields are automatically mapped so the user no longer need manually map them with the Parts Import Wizard. In addition, upon installation of CutList Plus fx 12.3, the CWX extension is associated with CutList Plus fx, so the user can simply double click on a CWX file and CutList Plus fx is opened to it.

4. Fixed an issue with Add material when the material name contained the inch unit mark ("), which caused weird behavior with the list drop down boxes.

5. Some users have experienced problems with materials.csv files that contain Euros currency. This problem is solved in CutList Plus fx version 12.3.

The attached images show the new Extended Entity Info Attributes and Setup tab and a sample cut list produced with CutList Bridge 4 and CutList Plus fx version 12.3. The video below is a ten minute introductory of CutList Bridge 4 and CutList Plus fx. You can also view it on YouTube in a larger format.

 

Where can I get CutList Bridge 4?

You can purchase CutList Bridge 4 in the Popular Woodworking Shop Woodworking on-line store.


SketchUp is woodworker’s chosen tool for creating shop drawings; CutList Plus fx by Bridgewood Design is the leading tool for generating optimized sheet layouts and materials lists. These two industry leading tools don’t natively communicate. That became history with the introduction of CutList Bridge. Now CutList Bridge 3 is even more powerful and rich with new features and is ready for even better things to come.

CutList Bridge Extension for SketchUp

You can purchase CutList Bridge 3 from the Popular Woodworking On-Line Store.

What is CutList Bridge?

New CutList Bridge 3 TabsMany of you have used this tool before, but for those of you who have not, CutList Bridge is a SketchUp Ruby extension. It extends the attributes of components to include such things as the material type used in its milling, the species or material name, re-sized dimensions, shop method tags, the sub-assembly to which it belongs and much more. These attributes are attached to the component and stored in the model file. The user can export these attribute to a comma separated value file (.csv aka CSV) and subsequently import that file into CutList Plus fx to produce a cut list, materials list, optimized cutting diagrams and project costing. If the user doesn’t have a CutList Plus fx license the CSV file can be imported to Microsoft Excel, Open/Office Calc or any spread sheet application that supports CSV importing.

A very important feature of CutList Bridge is that it stores all components’ material and milling attributes in the SketchUp model file. The user need keep only one file of a design and doesn’t have to worry about synchronizing other files when design changes are made. The CSV, CutList Plus fx, Excel or Calc files can all be reproduced in about four mouse clicks.

What’s New in CutList Bridge 3?

CutList Bridge 3 now supports component numbering capability including manually by the user, automatically in alphabetical or numerical order by CutList Bridge 3 and automatically by CabWriter. CabWriter is a new SketchUp Ruby extension to be announced later this fall. CabWriter automatically draws custom cabinets using a simple and powerful user interface; see the CabWriter drawn kitchen below. CutList Bridge 3 is CabWriter ready.

A CabWriter Drawn Kitchen

A new Tags field has been added to tag critical shop operations such as adjacent component grain matching. Any shop critical operation can be tagged in this text field and can be alphabetically sorted to assist in efficient performance of these shop operations. This field will also be supported in future releases of CutList Plus fx.

Re-sizing of thickness capability has been added to the Resizing field. And now there are three new fields to export the finished or As Drawn dimensions. These too will be supported in the next CutList Plus fx release.

There are a number of internal changes that make CutList Bridge 3 ready for CabWriter as well as the next version of CutList Plus fx.
For more information on CutList Bridge 3 see the CutList Bridge User’s Guide. Below is a partial cut list of the kitchen shown in the above image exported to CutList Plus fx.

A CutList Bridge Generated Cut List Exported To CutList Plus fx

 

Where Can I Get CutList Bridge 3?

CutList Bridge 3 is distributed exclusively by Popular Woodworking. You can purchase CutList Bridge 3 from the Popular Woodworking On-Line Store.

Is there a Training Course for CutList Bridge 3?

PWUlogo_300Yes. There’s a three segment on-line course titled Using CutList Bridge 3 and given by Popular Woodworking University. Each segment is approximately one hour long and covers creating a cut list for three types of woodworking project: Furniture Pieces, Custom Cabinets & Structures such as a shed, home and home addition.


PWUlogo_300

I have teamed up with Popular Woodworking University (PWU) to provide a comprehensive course on modeling furniture in SketchUp. The course is called SketchUp Comprehensive and you can register by clicking on the PWU logo above. If you have not heard of SketchUp you might want to read this PDF file titled So What Is SketchUp.

In this course, I will teach you how to download, install, setup and use SketchUp. You’ll learn to customize the SketchUp drawing toolbar, edit preferences and tailor the SketchUp environment to your liking. You will learn how to set up shortcut keys that let you switch tools quickly, and I’ll introduce you to some handy plugins that I have developed. You’ll get 12 video lessons, sample models, exercises and projects that will build your knowledge. All videos can be downloaded to your system so you will always have them to reference.

This course requires only that you know how to use a computer. There is no prerequisite for SketchUp itself. The course will take you from beginner to modeling complex furniture component shapes. Come join us.

Here is the course outline:

 

SketchUp Comprehensive

 

From Download to Project Models

 

Part 1 – Introduction to SketchUp

 

Part 1 is a one segment part. It comprises an introductory document that answers the question “So What Is SketchUp?” and a one hour video that will cover downloading, setting up, personalizing the work area, familiarization with important tools and dialog boxes and modify or adding short cut keys. It will also introduce the student to Ruby scripts by installing one authored by me and which is necessary for this course.

Segment 1 – Installing & Setting Up SketchUp

 

bedside_table1. So What Is SketchUp.pdf – Read this document before viewing Installing and Setting Up SketchUp.mp4.

2. Installing and Setting Up SketchUp.mp4 – To be viewed after reading So What Is SketchUp.pdf.

3. Segment 1 – Student Exercise.pdf – Questions to be answered and exercises to be completed at the end of viewing Installing and Setting Up SketchUp.mp4.

Part 2 – The Bedside Table

 

In Part 2 that student will begin with a blank sheet and draw an entire woodworking project titled The Bedside Table. At the completion or Part 2 the student will have drawn a complete set of shop drawings and a photorealistic image of the crafted piece. By focusing on one project, the student will learn the sequence and all the steps necessary to produce any project from scratch.

dough_boxSegment 2 – Drawing Tapered Legs

 

In Segment 2 the student will learn to draw tapered legs. Many of the basic and commonly used SketchUp tools will be introduced in this segment. Segment 2 is a foundation segment. I will introduce my six rules for modeling in SketchUp.

Segment 3 – Adding Aprons, Joinery, Rails and Top

 

In Segment 3 the instructor introduces a very basic tenet of modeling with SketchUp: Letting the model define subsequent parts and joinery. Drawing the aprons tenons and mortises will demonstrate and bring home this very important concept. The student is introduced to circular curves. In addition, he/she learns to think ahead to easy ways of modeling that save time and effort, particularly when doing so while using the tenant introduced in Segment 3.

Segment 4 – Drawing the Drawer Sliders and Drawer Box

 

shaker_stoolIn Segment 4 the student learns to use the Protractor, Move/Copy Multiple, Circle and Intersect Faces tools to draw dovetailed drawer sides, front, back and tapered bottom. These are the primary elements of the traditional drawer. We will complete the drawer in Segment 5.

Segment 5 – Adding Cock Beading and Turned Drawer Pull

 

Segment 5 is follow-on to Segment 4. In it we complete the traditional drawer by adding cock bead trim and a turned drawer pull.

 

Segment 6 – Dimensioning and Texturing

 

The ultimate goal of Part 2 is to create shop drawings sufficient to not only build the Bedside Table, but use as a “marketing” tool to sell prospective clients. In Segment 7 we add dimensioning and scenes. Digital images of wood grain will be used to textures each part allowing for a photorealistic imaging.

 

Part 3 –non-Rectilinear Pieces and Complex Curves

 

arched_hoodPart 2 focused on one furniture piece and showed the student how it is modeled from blank sheet to finished shop drawings and photorealistic images. In Part 3 we will look at individual furniture pieces that require “difficult” or “complex” modeling skills. The student will learn that these are neither difficult nor complex once the techniques are explained.

Segment 7 – Splayed Pieces: The Dough Box

 

Orthogonal or rectilinear parts are easy to model, but what about splayed legs? How do you determine the compound angles? How do you draw the joinery for chair legs? These questions will be answered in Segment 7 using the example of a Dough Box.

Segment 8 – Splayed Pieces: The Shaker Stool

 

Segment 8 builds on Segment 7 to show the student how to apply splayed techniques to turned pieces with the example of a Shaker Stool.

Segment 9 – Modeling a Clock Hood with 3 Dimensional Circular Curves

 

bracket_feetThe curved rail in the Bedside Table is quite simple. The curve is only one dimensional, i.e. it is a curve in only one plane. But how do you model a piece that curves in two or three dimensions? This happens a lot in clock pieces, especially grandfather clocks. The student will be exposed to the tricks to managing these parts in Segment 9.

Segment 10 – Table Top Edges with Non-Circular Curves

 

Segment 10 is the student’s first introduction to non-circular curves, i.e. curves that cannot be drawn with a simple circle or circle segment. There are a lot of tools that can help the SketchUp modeler with these curves. They are often modeled with Bezier or Spline drawing tools not unlike drawing curves with a pencil and French curve. The student will begin his/her foray into complex curves in this segment.

Segment 11 – Bracket Feet with Bezier Curves

 

cabriole_legsIn Segment 11 another important technique used in modeling parts with curves in more than one dimension is introduced. The technique is surprisingly simple; break the part into two or more parts, model simple curves and then take the intersections of these parts. This technique is used a lot in modeling bracket feet as we will do in this segment.

Segment 12 – Cabriole Legs with Bezier Curves

 

Segment 12 is the last and crowning segment in this tutorial. Not surprisingly, in this segment we learn to use some of our latent artistic talents to model the Cabriole leg. The Cabriole leg is modeled by joining three parts into one. The first two are joined much as the student did in Segment 11 to create a new part. This new part is then joined with a third part, the legs pad or slipper foot. This last step requires the students sense of artistry to “stich” the parts together.


Basic SketchUp 2014 for Woodworkers

In my Chiefwoodworker’s Newsletter 3-9-2013 Addendum issue I announced that American Woodworker and Chiefwoodworker have teamed to bring in-depth and quality SketchUp training to a greater audience of woodworkers. Since March 12, 2013 Chiefwoodworker’s Beginner’s SketchUp Tutorials and Intermediate SketchUp Tutorials have been available exclusively through AmericanWoodworkerTV. Those tutorials were restricted to viewing on-line only and many of you have written to request a downloadable or DVD version.

Intermediate SketchUp 2014 for WoodworkersA confluence of events created “The Perfect Storm” which brings us to a new stage in the life of these tutorials.

Event one occurred on January 17, 2014; F+W Media announced it had purchased New Track Media. What that meant for woodworkers is that American Woodworker joined Popular Woodworking under the F+W Media umbrella. Both magazines will continue under their own publishing name but they are managed by the same team.

Intermediate SketchUp 2014 for WoodworkersEvent two occurred February 5th when I was contacted by F+W Media and asked if I would be interested in developing a DVD set of the Beginner’s and Intermediate SketchUp Tutorials. I of course said yes.

Finally, event three occurred a few weeks into that effort on February 28th when Trimble announced SketchUp Make 2014 and SketchUp Pro 2014. We quickly scrambled to redo all the videos to be compatible with SketchUp version 2014.

These two American Woodworker video tutorials, updated for SketchUp 2014 and called Basic and Intermediate SketchUp 2014 for Woodworkers, are now available at Popular Woodworking’s Shop Woodworking store, both in DVD format and download and in bundled sets. You access them directly from the following links:

Basic SketchUp 2014 for Woodworkers DVD

Basic SketchUp 2014 for Woodworkers Download

Intermediate SketchUp 2014 for Woodworkers DVD

Intermediate SketchUp 2014 for Woodworkers Download

 

SketchUp 2014 for Woodworkers Video Download Bundle

Stay tuned for future planned SketchUp activities at American Woodworker and Popular Woodworking coming soon.


MG_1940_thumb2

have written before about The Heartwood School, which is focused on homebuilding crafts, particularly timber framing. Heartwood resides in the town of Washington located in the Berkshire Hills of western Massachusetts. It is run by Will and Michele Beemer. The school offers a full range of home construction and woodworking courses – including a SketchUp course for timber framers. There is now several Build Your Own: courses including Country Windsor Chair, Woodworker’s Workbench, Shavehorse, Pole Lathe and Heirloom Dovetail Toolchest. ALso added is an Advanced SketchUp Pro: Layout course.

The Heartwood School’s course list and 2014 schedule is shown below. For a complete course description go to http://www.heartwoodschool.com/coursefr.html and in the table’s second column locate the course of interest and click the link. For further information or to register contact Michele Beemer at 413/623-6677, www.heartwoodschool.com or request@heartwoodschool.com.

Two Week Courses:

July 7 – 18 Comprehensive Housebuilding

 

One Week Workshops:

April 21 – 25 Fundamentals of Woodworking
April 28 – May 2 Cabinetmaking
May 5 – 9 Stairbuilding
May 12 – 16 Build Your Own: Shavehorse
May 19 – 23 Build Your Own: Country Windsor Chair
June 9 – 13 Build Your Own: Workbench
June 16 – 20 Timber Framing
June 23 – 27 Scribed Timber Framing – Using Natural Forms
July 21 – 25 Finish Carpentry
July 28 – Aug 1 Cruck Framing
Aug. 11 – 15 Carpentry for Women
Aug. 18 – 22 Converting Trees to Timber
Aug. 25 – 29 Timber Framing
Sept. 8 – 12 Compound Joinery for Timber Framers
Sept. 15 – 19 Build a Skin-on-Frame Canoe
Sept. 22 – 26 Carve a 17th century Oak Box – Peter Follansbee
Sept. 29 – Oct 3 Build Your Own: Pole Lathe
Sept. 29 – Oct 3 Build Your Own: Heirloom Dovetail Toolchest
Oct. 6 – 10 Stairbuilding
Oct. 13 – 17 Fundamentals of Woodworking
Oct. 20 – 24 Cabinetmaking

 

Other Workshops:

April 7 – 9 Timber Grading (3-day)
April 17 – 19 Tangent Handrailing (3-day)
May 29 – 31 Hip and Valley Roof Framing for Carpenters (3-day)
May 29 – 31 Build an Outdoor Earthen Bake Oven (3-day)
June 2 – 4 Eyebrow Dormers (3-day)
June 5 – 7 Intro to SketchUp for Timber Framers (3-day)
June 6 – 7 Concrete Countertops (2-day)
June 30 – July 2 Traditional Raising and Rigging (3-day)
Sept. 4 – 6 Timber Frame Design & Joinery Decisions (3-day)
Sept. 26 – 27 Advanced SketchUpPro: Layout (2–day)

American Woodworker Home PageIn addition to posting here on my own blog, I am now posting on American Woodworker (AW). My AW posts will focus on SketchUp and related issues. I will be posting approximately four times a month. In addition to the link above you can access my AW posts from the AW home page under the heading Contributor’s Blogs. And don’t forget, my Beginner’s and Intermediate SketchUp videos can be accessed on AmericanWoodworker.TV. Check it out and visit me at both sites!


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I am pleased to announce that American Woodworker and Chiefwoodworker have teamed to bring in-depth and quality SketchUp training to a greater audience of woodworkers. Beginning March 12, 2013 Chiefwoodworker’s Beginner’s SketchUp Tutorials and Intermediate SketchUp Tutorials will be available exclusively through AmericanWoodworkerTV.

AWtv-Beginners-trailerFrom the day I learned of Google SketchUp (now Trimble SketchUp) I became convinced it was a tool perfectly tailored for woodworkers. I have worked hard since 2007 to provide training to fellow woodworkers in the use of this tool. I have met a lot of woodworkers over the last six years and believe I succeeded in giving them the training they needed to add Trimble SketchUp to their woodworking toolbox.

However, the reach of Chiefwoodworker’s Blog can’t compare to the audience American Woodworker enjoys. American Woodworker is dedicated to providing training to woodworkers in all areas of woodworking with quality videos hosted by knowledgeable and expert woodworkers. It is my hope and belief that reaching a much greater audience with my tutorials will provide a greater service to woodworkers everywhere. I am delighted and proud to team with American Woodworker to benefit my fellow woodworkers.

AWtv-intermediate-trailerChiefwoodworker’s Blog will continue to provide posts, newsletters and videos on woodworking and SketchUp and I will continue to support my fellow woodworkers with SketchUp assistance when asked. In addition, I will continue to develop and provide SketchUp plugins. I also expect that my relationship with American Woodworker will grow. So stay tuned to my website (srww.com, Chiefwoodworker’s Blog, Chiefwoodworker’s Newsletter and look for me on AmericanWoodworker.tv.

American Woodworker Magazine, AmericanWoodworker.com, AmericanWoodworker.TV and Woodwork Magazine are all properties of New Track Media LLC.


I teach SketchUp in a number of the local colleges and woodworking schools. If you live in the area, plan to vacation in the area or would like to stay in the area for a class, check out my schedule below. Anyone who wishes to visit the area for a class, or any reason, contact me and I can help you make arrangements at very reasonable rates.

Beginner’s SketchUp Courses

Berkshire Community College, Pittsfield, MA – Wednesday Evenings, 6 – 8pm, Intermodal Center Room 1 beginning January 25,2012. See http://digital.turn-page.com/issue/50000/2 Career Enhancement – Design section on page 34. Contact Linda Pierce at (413) 236-2122.

Connecticut Valley School of Woodworking, Manchester, CT – Saturday & Sunday workshop, February 18th & 19th, 2012. Contact Bob Van Dyke at (860) 647-0303. See A Beginners Guide to Using SketchUp in Woodworking below.

Berkshire Community College, Pittsfield, MA – Saturday May 12th & Saturday May 19th, 2012 from  9am to 5pm. See http://digital.turn-page.com/issue/50000/2 Career Enhancement – Design section on page 34. Contact Linda Pierce at (413) 236-2122.

Advanced SketchUp Courses

Connecticut Valley School of Woodworking, Manchester, CT – Saturday & Sunday workshop, April  14th & 15th, 2012. Contact Bob Van Dyke at (860) 647-0303. See Google SketchUp for Furniture – Advanced Techniques below.

Other SketchUp Appearances

I will also be giving introductory SketchUp talks at the Northeast Woodworker’s Association’s Saratoga Showcase on March 31st and April 1st, 2012 at Saratoga Springs City Center, Saratoga, NY. This is the best woodworking show I have ever attended and a must for any woodworker within distance.

Connecticut Valley School of Woodworking

Bob Van Dyke, Director - Connecticut Valley School of WoodworkingConnecticut Valley School of Woodworking is a premier woodworking school dedicated to teaching excellence in craftsmanship. CVSW has a wide range of woodworking courses and many of them are taught by its director, Bob Van Dyke, pictured right. Courses range from woodworking fundamentals to ten week fine furniture projects, wood turning, finishing and focused woodworking skills. In addition to Bob, CVSW provides courses taught by world class woodworkers such as Chris Schwarz, Glenn Huey, Phil Lowe, Mario Rodriguez and many more. Courses range in length from one lecture to weekend, week long and ten weeks. Check out the 2012 course schedule. In the schedule, under Specialty & Weekend Classes you will find yours truly. I will be teaching a beginner’s SketchUp course. I have copied that section below. If you live in the Northeast of the USA, I promise this will be a course that will add significantly to your woodworking skills. I look forward to meeting with you and talking shop and SketchUp.

A Beginners Guide to Using SketchUp in Woodworking

Computer aided designing has become more and more widespread and consequently- a lot simpler than when it started out. Google SketchUp 8 is a free and powerful tool that is being used by woodworkers everywhere. The Pro version is used by professional to model and design everything from bottles to skyscrapers. We will use the free version to model a Bedside Table complete with tapered legs, mortise and tenon joinery, beveled top, dovetailed drawer trimmed with bull nose cock beading and a Shaker style drawer pull. We will begin by learning how to install SketchUp, setup application preferences, choose model defaults and customize a template. Next we will tour the work area and become familiar with its tools. The heart of this course is modeling the Bedside Table and producing dimensioned shop drawings and photorealistic textured images. Finally we will learn how to extend the functionality of SketchUp through the use and customization of Ruby scripts. A laptop computer is helpful for this two day class. Basic computer knowledge is helpful. If you have any questions please contact the school’s director, Bob Van Dyke at (860) 647-0303. Sign up today. Tuition: $255.00 Materials are included

Section 021812B: Saturday & Sunday, February 18 & 19, 9:30 – 5:00pm

Google SketchUp for Furniture – Advanced Techniques
This is an intermediate course in Google SketchUp. The beginner’s course, A Beginners Guide to Using SketchUp in Woodworking, is recommended prior to taking this course. The free version of SketchUp will be used primarily, but the students will be exposed to the Pro version also. The focus of this course is modeling non-linear components; i.e. components with circular and complex shapes. The format of the two day workshop is six sessions, each session a one hour lecture followed by a one hour lab. Students should bring a laptop (notebook) to class with SketchUp 8 already installed.

Session 1 will begin with an arched rail for a clock door, the arch being a simple circular curve. Each session will progress to more complex shapes. Session 5 will focus on modeling cabriole legs using Bezier Spline curves. Each session will include an introduction to new tools – including a few Ruby script extensions to SketchUp – necessary to create these ever increasing complex shapes.

Finally, Session 6 will introduce the Pro version of SketchUp. The instructor will detail the differences in the free and Pro versions and even demonstrate a few of the new tools in SketchUp Pro 8. In addition, the student will be introduced to LayOut 3, a 2D presentation application that comes with the Pro License. Students will be shown how LayOut 3 can be used to create professional looking shop drawings and marketing materials. If you have any questions please contact the school’s director, Bob Van Dyke at (860) 647-0303.

Section 041412B: Saturday & Sunday, April 14 & 15, 9:30am – 5:00pm


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