The Supreme Drill Press Table Mounted On My Delta Drill Press In March of this year I found myself wishing I had a drill press table with a fence to aid in accurately drilling a series of holes. My first thought was to build one; then my long standing rule of “using my time and efforts to build furniture and not jigs or fixtures” kicked in. So with the help of my large collection of woodworking catalogs and the internet I researched drill press tables available on the market. I settled on the Supreme Drill Press Table from Peachtree Woodworking Supply, Inc. (http://www.ptreeusa.com) shown left attached to my Delta drill press. The table is 15” deep by 24” wide and 1 3/8” thick. As shown there are two 22” fences which are closed to produce a 44” fence. These can be fully extended to form a 72” fence. It comes with two hold downs and two UHMW stop blocks. There are also two inserts to plug the hole in the center of the table that is provided for drill through.

Drilling A Series Of Holes Aligned By The Fence Since March I have used this table on numerous occasions leaving me to wonder how I ever worked without it. T-tracks on the bottom allow you to fasten the table to the drill press and provide plenty of travel front to back. The hold downs are secured in T-tracks that run front to back and are great for securing single thickness boards or boards with backing as shown at right. The star knobs allow for quick adjustments between drillings while providing plenty of clamping power. This is particularly necessary when drilling large wholes with a drill or Forstner bit.

Shaker Clock On Drill Press Table With Supporting Rollers I recently completed a wall hanging Shaker clock. The clock doors are held closed with magnetic catches which are secured in the sides by recessing them in shallow holes. I didn’t want to drill them by hand for fear of drilling them off vertical alignment. Further, I wanted to control the depth of the holes very accurately. After pondering this for a few minutes I wondered if my new drill press table could do the job. In order to get the sides under the Forstner bit I had to bring the table completely forward which caused me to think the setup might be unstable. Also the clock is about 4 feet long and holes had to be drilled close to one end, creating another potentially unstable situation. The former was no problem at all and the latter was solved with the use of adjustable roller supports shown left above.

Bessey Bar Clamps Are Used To Hold The Clock In Place For this operation I removed the fence and centered the holes in the side by eye. I adjusted the depth of the Forstner bit and locked it in place. Then I simply slid the clock along between drillings. Though it may not have been necessary, given the weight of the clock, I used Bessey Bar clamps to it in place while drilling.

I probably could have completed this operation without the use of the drill press and table. However, it sure made me feel at ease knowing I wouldn’t screw up this last step, which surely could have ruined my whole day. My brother-in-law, Winter Bargeron, calls these critical steps, with their potentially disastrous consequences, the “money cut”. Well, this table costs about $250 and is worth every penny.

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4 Responses to “Supreme Drill Press Table From Peachtree”


  1. Jeff says:

    That’s pretty cool. A new drillpress is my next big purchase.


  2. Joe says:

    Hi Jeff,

    The drill press is definitely a “must” tool in a wood shop. I think it was the second power tool I purchased many years ago. The band saw is probably the one I would put up at number two or three these days.

    Joe….


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  4. Louis Loves his Drill Press says:

    You experience is very useful for other people.

    Louis Alston R
    Drill Press Reviews