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Finished Panels With 3 Coats Of Wipe-On-Poly Picking up from where I left off in Trundle Bed Crafting – Part 1, I finished all five panels. Three panels will be framed in the headboard and two in the footboard. Just like panels in frame-and-panel construction you must add a few coats of finish to the panels before encasing them in their frame. If this step is skipped unsightly unfinished edges are visible as the panel expands/contracts through seasonal changes.

Trundle Bed Shown With The Trundle Out The next step in Trundle Bed Crafting is to tackle the swan necks that top the headboard. I began by printing out a full scale SketchUp drawing of one swan neck. They are mirror images of each other so all I need is one paper template. However, the swan necks are constructed with two layers glued together and the result is a 3 1/4” piece of stock. Since I need to shape four pieces, all with the same top curve, two of them share the same bottom curve, and two have a bottom curve that is 3/4” away from and smaller than the other two, I decided to make one hardwood template. Using the paper template I traced it onto 3/4” thick cherry stock being careful to arrange the grain for best strength. I rough cut the template on the band saw and completed the shaping on the edge sander.

Completed Swan Neck Cherry Template The completed cherry template, shown left, will be used in a series of steps with template router bits. The Swan Neck presents a number of interesting challenges for the woodworker. The first one is its thickness. The Swan Neck is 3 1/4” total thickness made of a sandwich of a 2 1/4” back and 1” front. I designed it as a sandwich to make shaping easier and doable with my current collection of shaper and router bits. But even the back is wider than my longest 2” template bit.

The Cherry Template Is Traced On 2 1/4" Thick Stock Fortunately I have two 2” template bits; one with a bottom bearing and one with a top bearing. So I used a three step procedure to shape the Swan Neck backs. I traced the cherry template on 2 1/4” stock. I needed two of them and they need to be mirror images which was simply a matter of flipping the cherry template.

Rough Cutting The Thick Back On The Band Saw The first step in this three step procedure is to rough cut the thick Swan Neck back on the band saw. My band saw had a 1 1/4” re-saw blade mounted in it and I should have replaced it with one much narrower allowing me to follow the curves smoothly. But being lazy I simply hacked away at the stock with the re-saw blade. You can see the resulting burn marks created by a 1 1/4” blade struggling to follow comparatively sharp curves. But with no damage to the blade I was able to cut to within 1/8” of the outline making the job for the template router bit minimal. When I was done I had Side A and Side B of the Swan Neck back and the template.

Shaping All But Top 3/4" Of Swan Neck With Bottom Bearing Template Bit The second step in this three step process it to attach the template to the appropriate side of the one of the Swan Neck backs. Appropriate side means keeping the side labels matched, for example Side A facing up on both, but with the template on the bottom. I attached the cherry template to the Swan Neck back using double sided sticky tape (carpet tape). In this step I use the bottom bearing template bit and with the template as a guide and shape all but about 3/4” of the Swan Neck as shown at right.

Complete Shaping With Top Bearing Bit In the third step of this process I replace the bottom bearing template bit with a top bearing template bit, remove the cherry template, turn the Swan Neck over and use its partially shaped surface as a template. See the picture at left. I have to use this three step process on both Swan Neck backs. But I am not done; I still need to shape the Swan Neck fronts. However, they are only 1” thick and only require rough cutting and one template bit. But there are still some tricks that need to be employed to complete the Swan Necks as you will see in Trundle Bed Crafting – Part 3.


Note: Chiefwoodworker Newsletter recipients received an early version of this review. Since then I have had a chance to do some real work with this machine and have added some new comments and adjusted old comments to reflect that experience. You may wish to reread it.

Fully Assembled G0512 Edge Sander With Shop Fox Base Some of you may recall I have a Grizzly 8” Jointer and wrote a not so glowing review of it on my website. My brother recently bought a Grizzly lathe and it is a honey. So, when I decided to purchase an edge sander I decided to give Grizzly another chance and purchased the model G0512. It arrived on September 8 and this is a chronicle of my experience.

Events did not start well. The unit was delivered by UPS. The driver parked at the bottom of my driveway and phoned to ask I come and receive the unit. This was not a surprise. Grizzly warns you during delivery scheduling (via phone) that the truck is a tractor/trailer and may not have a lift. Further, my driveway is very long with low power lines crossing it. What was a surprise was the condition of the box. There were two large holes clearly made by a fork lift. The UPS driver told me they existed when he picked the box up at the Grizzly facility. I believe him because the only fork lift he had was a manual one. To create these holes you would have had to use a powered fork lift (or intentionally rammed the box multiple times with the manual fork lift). I insisted he accompany me to my shop, help me unload the sander and open the box to inspect every piece for damage or scratches. After careful inspection there appeared to be no damage and I signed the delivery form.

Shop Fox Base Is Too Large And Difficult To Modify In addition to the G0512 Edge Sander I ordered the companion base. The base turned out to be an adjustable base made by Shop Fox. Its minimum dimension in the short side is 18 ½”. The G0512 base is 15” wide in the minimum dimension leaving a 3 ½” gap. To fix this I contemplated cutting 3 ½” off the metal rails or putting a platform in the base and living with it. Cutting 3 1/2” off the rail was not an option because the gap between the feet was about 1 1/2”, making the feet still 2” too wide. I chose the platform option for now. You can see the gap in the picture above. I spaced it evenly on both sides of the base. In actual use I noticed that this “too wide” base cuts down on the toe clearance; it is possible to accidentally stub your toe if you are not careful.

The real problem with the Shop Fox base is that if you follow the directions for assembly the base does not work; you can’t rotate the swivel wheels. Using the bolts they specify prevents swivel. Worse, some of the assembly instructions were physically impossible to perform. But being a clever guy I came up with a method of assembly that worked. I suspect my method is what Shop Fox designers intended, but the instructions are grossly wrong.

Back View Showing Belt Tensioning MechanismAt this point, I was getting frustrated and decided to make a thorough inspection of all remaining pieces before going any further. I noticed an additional assembly issue. The table is attached with a raising/lowering threaded lead screw, threaded hand wheel and three L-shaped brackets. The instructions showed a picture of three simple brackets, each a different size; large, medium and small. What I received where three brackets of two sizes, large and two small ones. The large one was not a simple bracket, it had a metal plate, two bolts and four Allen screws, though I have no idea what their function is. Obviously a change had been made to the design and that change had not been reflected in the documentation. Again, being a clever guy, I completed the assembly with no further problems.

Motor Direct Drives Roller Installing a sanding belt and adjusting tracking is simple and quick. The entire operation can be accomplished in less than three minutes without exaggeration. The tracking adjustment is sensitive but holds steady when achieved. The picture above right shows a close-up of the belt tensioning and tracking adjustment. The first thing to notice is how simple, yet solid, the design is. The long lever loads and unloads the tension of the belt. The middle knob adjusts tracking; you course adjust it first by hand spinning the belt and centering it on the drive wheel and then turn on power and carefully and gently fine adjust it. The knob on the right locks the tracking adjustment. Simple as that.

The Back Side Has No Platen - So Why The Table? The motor is 1.5 HP and comes pre-wired for 220 VAC. The dive is direct to the pulley wheel. The graphite coated platen is 6-1/4" x 31-1/2" and exists only on one side of the belt. The table top however, is equally spaced on both sides. Without a platen on the back side a table on the back side seems pointless. I may take this into account when I redesign the table top and add some self-designed accessories on the back in place of the table.

I read numerous reviews prior to acquiring this unit. There were two consistent complaints. One was that the table came warped and was flimsy. The second was that the belt(s) that came with the unit was unusable because the splice joint is too thick. I found the table to be OK. Its surface has a noticeable, but very shallow bumpiness. It doesn’t seem to adversely affect the sander’s use. The table is made of 7/8 inch plywood finished with a thin Formica-like surface. I suspect the very thin Formica-lake material gives way to trapped glue unevenness and that is what gives the surface a somewhat bumpy look. I may build my own from 1” sheet Melamine and fit it with a metal guide to accept a sliding T-fence. Perhaps even a circle attachment. However, as the table comes it is workable.

Full Scale SketchUp Paper Template Of Swan NeckThe belt, on the other hand, is rather cheap and indeed does have the problem indicated in the reviews. Unfortunately I ordered four additional belts of various grits and they are the same. In actual use the seam is so poor it creates a high velocity (1800 fpm) speed bump, making it difficult to control the work piece and get a smooth finish. I found this constant fight to control the work piece tiring. In one Amazon.com review I read the belts were referred to as “a piece of crap”. I would have to agree; they are inexcusably poor.  However, 80” belts are available from a number of reputable third parties. I highly recommend that if you buy this unit do not get additional belts from Grizzly.

Shaping Cherry Template On The Grizzly Edge Sander

My first project to make use of this machine is a Trundle Bed. To shape the template for swan neck I traced a full scale SketchUp drawing onto a 3/4” cherry board. I then rough cut the template on my band saw and finished it by hand shaping on the Grizzly Edge Sander. The high velocity seed bumps notwithstanding I was able to create a very useful cherry template. One last comment I should make; I found I used the small roller end of the sander most of the time and this end is furthest from the dust collection hence a lot of dust is left on the table uncollected. A repositionable  dust collector, or perhaps an array of holes in the table with dust collection underneath, may make it into my new table design. Let’s wait and see.

The bottom line is that I think I will like this machine and the cost is hard to beat – approximately $850 including base. So Grizzly is back on my list of manufacturers I will look at. But given my mixed experience I have two words of caution – caveat emptor (let the buyer beware).

 


Frank Redmile Adjusting A Longcase Most woodworkers eventually find themselves building a case for a mechanical clock movement. I can tell you from painful personal experience that the choice of movement can be a daunting and overwhelming experience. In addition, finding design documentation and support, particularly finding answers to questions that will invariably arise, is almost impossible. Fortunately there are reputable suppliers if you know where to look. One such dealer is Oakside Classic Clocks.

Oakside Classic Clocks of England is a one person business. Frank Redmile, owner and sole proprietor, designs and creates longcase clocks that sell all around the globe. Frank also has the largest inventory of German made Kiesinger movements. In addition to his finished clocks, Frank sells Kieninger clock movement kits to hobbyist clockmakers and woodworkers. If you need Kieninger replacement parts, Oakside Classic Clocks is the place to look. Likewise, you can get movements, movement documentation, dials, pendulums or other accessories. Check out Frank’s website or contact him directly on his Contact page.


Shaping Ogee Feet With The Intersection Tool Google announced the availability of SketchUp 8.0 on September 1, 2010. Both the free and Pro versions can be downloaded by going to the SketchUp Download Page. Before getting into some of the improvements, and there are some very significant ones, let me make an observation that is a little troubling. It appears that Google is implementing the “Bait and Switch” strategy with this release. In the past all versions of SketchUp had a free and Pro version. The free version was fully featured as far as modeling was concerned, i.e. all the drawing tools were present in both versions. In this version Google has implemented five drawing tools which are only available in the Pro version; and these tools are not just nice to have tools, they are significant productivity improvement tools.

To me this signals a trend where the free and Pro versions will grow substantially apart in the future, encouraging, even making necessary, users to purchase the Pro version if they wish to enjoy the drawing capabilities of SketchUp. I suspect this is a result of the enormous popularity of SketchUp brought about by the availability of the free version. Now that SketchUp has reached the “ubiquitous” milestone  we may even see the free version phased out altogether, or become so featureless as compared to the Pro version that it dies on its own. I hope not, but to this point SketchUp has been a little too-good-to-be-true, and all good things come to an end at some point.

To see all the new features in SketchUp 8 go to What’s New in Google SketchUp 8. But the five drawing features I have referred to above, which are only available in the Pro, are:

  1. Union – joins together selected solids. (Solid is a new entity in SketchUp. It is a group or component which is totally enclosed and with no dangling lines or surfaces.) As far as I can tell on quick inspection, this tool is the same as a  new tool included in both versions called Outer Shell, but I need to investigate further to see if there is any significant difference.
  2. Intersect – makes a new solid group from the intersection of selected solids and discards the non-intersecting entities.
  3. Subtract – The intersecting portion of the first solid is subtracted from a second solid. The first solid is eliminated. Google refers to this as a cookie cutter.
  4. Trim – The same as the Subtract except the first solid remains in place.
  5. Split – Creates three solid groups out of two overlapping solids: the first solid minus the overlap, the overlap and the second solid minus the overlap. Similar to Intersect but the non-intersecting entities remain in place.

These logical operations are the missing operations found in most 3D CAD tools. Till now we have had to rely on the Edit/Intersect/Intersect with Model tool and lots of cleanup to perform these operations. The Pro version of SketchUp also comes with LayOut 3 and Style Builder 2. The improvements in these tools are also explained in What’s New in Google SketchUp 8. All-in-all this version release seems to be a significant improvement over SketchUp 7, especially for the Pro users.

It is really too bad that these new logical operations tools will not be part of the free version. I feel like I should personally apologize for Google, but since I have no relationship with Google I can only hope they will apologize for themselves.


High School Push StickFor those of you who took woodworking shop in high school you are likely to remember this useful safety device. It was typically made from scrap 1/4” or 1/2” plywood and shaped to fit your hand. The High School Push Stick is most useful for pushing narrow pieces through a table saw while keeping your fingers far away from the saw blade. For this reason I prefer the narrower 1/4” version.

Anyone who has used this handy little device will agree it is invaluable in the wood shop. So I have taken to providing readers my most complex SketchUp model yet; High School Push Stick.skp. Download it by clicking this link.

Create A Template

Open the model and choose Camera/Parallel Projection. Choose Camera/Standard Views/Front. Zoom Extents and minimize the amount of white space around the model by adjusting the window size (this is necessary to print this model on a single 8 1/2” x 11” page). In the Print Setup Dialog box choose the Properties Button. Choose the Basic Tab and select Landscape. In the print Preview Dialog box uncheck both “Fit to page” and “Use model extents”. Enter 1 and Inches for both “In the printout” and “In SketchUp” (this produces a 1:1 print scale). Now choose Print at the top of the menu bar. If you have trouble printing to scale read Printing To Scale In SketchUp.

Sandwich the printout between two sheets of Self Adhesive Clear Plastic which you can buy at any office supply store or Amazon.com. Carefully cut out the template of the Push Stick and trace it onto a scrap of 1/4” plywood.

Cutout The Push Stick

There are three straight-line cuts that should be made on a table saw. They are: the 8 1/2” long line, the 1/4” short line and the 1” line. The three lines are perpendicular to each other. Cut these first. Next, use a jig saw, scroll saw or band saw to rough out the curves. Finally, with an edge sander and oscillating spindle sander (or just your hands) sand the curved edges to final shape. That’s it -  you now have a very handy and safe High School Push Stick.

Using The Push Stick To Shape Mullions & Muntins

Mullions Have A Through Mortise You can make a career out of searching for the correct definition of mullions and muntins but don’t waste your time. Suffice it to say they are both parts of a window or door, and they frame its lights. I think of mullions as the more complex of the two which has one or more through mortises and two tenons.

Muntins Have No Through Mortise Muntins on the other hand are less complex with no through mortise and two tenons. Definitions you will find on the internet vary all over the place; some even give the mullion a structural meaning similar to a stile. The tenons on a mullion usually fit into a stile or rail while those of a muntin fit into the through mortise of a mullion. Ok, with that as the definition for mullion and muntin let me demonstrate how the push stick can be used with both the router and table saw to shape them.

Feeding Narrow Stock Through A Table Saw The most often used application for the push stick is to feed thin or narrow pieces of stock through a table saw. In the picture at left I am cutting two rabbets in a muntin by holding 3/4” stock against the fence with a feather board and feeding the stock with the push stick. Notice my hands and fingers are well clear of the red area and at least six inches from the blade. (There are numerous feather board designs that can be used allowing for taller and still narrow stock.) In this case the push stick is merely feeding the stock, but not assisting in holding the stock against the fence.

The Push Stick Feeds & The Feather Board HoldsAnother application for the push stick is to feed narrow stock through a router. In the picture at right I begin the feed with the push stick held vertically and pushing the stock while my fingers hold the stock against the fence. The feather board does not engage until the stock leaves the cutting area. Because I don’t want my fingers to encroach the area above the metal plate I am limited in the length of stock I can shape with the router. These pieces are about minimum size.

The Push Stick Feeds And Assists The Feather Board As the feather board engages I tilt the push stick to about 35 degrees and assist the feather board in holding the stock against the fence. Here my fingers also help out. They have encroached on the area above the metal plate, but only after the stock completely surrounds the router bit, in essence shielding my fingers.

Shaping mullions and muntins are one of the more dangerous operations in a wood shop and for that reason many woodworkers build windows and doors that have lights using imatation mullions and muntins. I applaud that choice and understand it completely. But the push stick and feather board can go a long way in reducing the risk and making this operation much safer.


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